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Reading for pleasure increases cognitive progress

A NEW WORKING PAPER FROM THE CENTRE for Longitudinal Studies sets out to examine socio-economic inequalities in cognitive test scores at age 16. In particular, the authors were interested in whether reading for pleasure was linked to cognitive progress.

The study found that children who read for pleasure at the ages of 10 and 16 made more progress in mathematics, vocabulary, and spelling between the ages of 10 and 16 than those who rarely read, even after controlling for parental social background and parents’ own reading behaviour. The largest gains were for vocabulary. From a policy perspective, the authors say this strongly reinforces the need to support and encourage children’s reading in their leisure time.

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Published

February 2014