Learning together and alone

David Johnson and Roger Johnson argue that peers have positive influences on learning only within a cooperative context, and explain the basic elements that make cooperation work

There are three types of cooperative learning – formal, informal, and base groups. These types were derived from social interdependence theory, which has been validated by more than 1,200 research studies.

Power of peer interaction

Traditionally the interaction between adults and children is viewed as the most important vehicle for ensuring: effective learning; cognitive, moral, and social development; and socialization into the competencies, attitudes, and values needed to be contributing members of society.

What we know
● Peer interaction may promote achievement; healthy cognitive, moral, and social development; and socialization into the competencies, attitudes, and values needed to be contributing members of society.
● Constructive peer interaction requires that students spend most of the day in cooperative learning groups.
● To be cooperative, a lesson must include positive interdependence, individual accountability, promotive interaction, appropriate use of social skills, and group processing.
● The interaction among theory, research, and practice makes cooperative learning one of the strongest instructional procedures available to educators.

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Published

December 2015