Early identification and prevention of reading problems

What elements maximize the success of classroom instruction and supplemental early interventions for struggling readers? Stephanie Al Otaiba explains

SCHOOLS IN THE U.S. AND THROUGHOUT THE WORLD are engaging in education reform that involves increasing accountability to show that children in the early years learn to read. An important premise spearheading this reform is that effective early literacy instruction is the first line of defense in preventing reading problems. Teachers monitor students’ response to instruction, and if data suggests growth is not adequate, they provide supplemental “tiers” of increasingly intensive early intervention. This preventative approach is known as Response to Intervention (RTI).

What we know
● Effective early literacy instruction is the first line of defense in preventing reading problems.
● The success of classroom instruction can be maximized by an effective core literacy program, and using data to monitor progress and group students.
● Teaching assistants can effectively deliver evidence-based supplemental interventions.

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Published

November 2011